Between The Wars

This period in aviation history between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II would mark a progressive change from the slower wood-and-fabric biplanes of World War I to fast, streamlined metal monoplanes used in WWII, creating a revolution throughout the aviation industry.

During this period, civil aviation became widespread and famous feats took place such as round-the-world flights, air races and barnstorming. This era also saw the beginnings of the commercial airlines industry and the flying boat came to dominate the industry.

In military aviation, the fast all-metal monoplane emerged in such classic designs as the German Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the British Supermarine Spitfire, which would go on to see service in the coming war.

This period is sometimes called the Golden Age of Aviation.


WACO YMF-5 – N40116

Originally produced between 1934-1935 by the WACO Aircraft Company of Troy, Ohio, the WACO YMF-5 has been regarded as the finest open cockpit sport biplane ever built. With its clean lines showing off its classic biplane shape and its powerful 275 HP radial engine, this current production American built 3 person luxury biplane captures the essence of what flying is all about: Magic, Beauty, Adventure and Romance.

Production of the WACO YMF was re-established in 1986 by the Classic Aircraft Corp in Lansing, MI, many updated features were integrated into the design without taking away from the original heart and soul of the aircraft.

de Havilland DH.82 “Tiger Moth” – N4030E

The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland and was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and others as a primary trainer. The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until replaced by the de Havilland Chipmunk in 1952, when many of the surplus aircraft entered civil operation. Many other nations used the Tiger Moth in both military and civil applications, and it remains in widespread use as a recreational aircraft in many countries. It is still occasionally used as a primary training aircraft, particularly for those pilots wanting to gain experience before moving on to other tailwheel aircraft, although most Tiger Moths have a skid. Many are now employed by various companies offering trial lesson experiences. Those in private hands generally fly far fewer hours and tend to be kept in great condition.

Curtiss C-1 Robin – NX979K

The Curtiss Robin, introduced in 1928, was a high-wing monoplane with a 90 hp (67 kW) V8 OX-5 8-cylinder engine built by the Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company. It was later fitted with the more powerful Challenger engine, which developed between 170 and 185 hp (127 and 138 kW). NOTE: Model B (90 hp/67 kW Curtiss OX-5 engine), Model C-1 (185 hp/138 kW Curtiss Challenger engine), and Model J-1 (165 hp/123 kW Wright J-6 Whirlwind 5 engine)

Waco UPF-7 – NC29102

The Waco UPF-7 is an unusual airplane. Not due to any outstanding technical features but to timing. A relatively obsolete design, it was built in quantity at a time when the open cockpit biplane trainer for civilian use was virtually extinct. Even then, it slipped into service unnoticed since it had no significant new features to arouse the aviation community

Ryan PT-22 Recruit – N47843

The Ryan PT-22 Recruit, the main military version of the Ryan ST, is a military trainer aircraft used by the United States Army Air Corps and its successor, the United States Army Air Forces for primary pilot training. It was the first monoplane that the Army had used for primary pilot training, as all previous PT aircraft were biplanes.

de Havilland DH.94 Moth Minor – N94DH-AV977

The Moth Minor was designed as a low-wing monoplane to replace the biplane Moth series, intended to give similar performance on lower power, and not requiring rigging. With a selling price of only £575 the Moth Minor was popular with flying clubs keen to acquire modern monoplanes.

de Havilland DH.94 Moth Minor – GAFPN

The Moth Minor was designed as a low-wing monoplane to replace the biplane Moth series, intended to give similar performance on lower power, and not requiring rigging. With a selling price of only £575 the Moth Minor was popular with flying clubs keen to acquire modern monoplanes.